How to String Beads on Cord: Awl, Tweezers, And Other Techniques

How to String Beads on Cord: Awl, Tweezers, And Other Techniques

Regardless of your chosen technique, it is always advantageous to understand how to string beads on cord, mainly while working on a lengthy project. Wrap the working end and any unknotted beads around a cardboard or plastic bobbin to manage your string.

Xinar has been selling jewelry and jewelry making supplies for over twenty years. Our sterling silver beads, silver findings, and silver charms are hypoallergenic and made locally in the USA. Also, find inspiration from our Far Fetched collection of charms and jewelry today.

This will avoid the occurrence of tangling, knotting, and fraying. However, it is essential to realize that frayed cords readily snap.

Place your working cord and unknotted beads on the right side of the velvet board if you are right-handed. In the center of the velvet board, place a 12-inch segment of the working cord. Place the cord end with the first bead tip or bullion already attached to the velvet board’s left side. If you are left-handed, please reverse this setup and the subsequent instructions. Stretch the silk cord before commencing your knotting creation if you are using it.

Essentials Steps on How to String Beads on Cord

  1. Begin by moving the first bead from right to left over the working cord until it rests snuggly on the first bead tip or bullion and the first bead.
  2. With your right hand, lift the 12-inch portion of working cord and drape it over your left hand. The bead tip or bullion end should rest in your palm, while the unknotted beads and working cord end should dangle over the back of your hand.
  3. Grasp the working end of the cord with your right hand and continue to wrap it under your left hand, around the palm of your left hand, and then back over the top of your left hand to make a circle. The bead tip or bullion end should continue to rest in the palm of your left hand, while the working cord and unknotted beads should dangle over the back of your left hand.
  4. To create the first overhand knot, cross the bead tip or bullion end of the cord from left to right over and over the working cord, which is wrapped across the palm of your left hand.
  5. Drop the bead tip or bullion end of the cord from right to left underneath this stretch of working cord. This will create an overhand knot.
  6. Every knot begins with this step of tying an overhand knot; however, there are other methods to tighten and adequately position knots utilizing the following equipment and techniques.

Awl-Based Knotting

Next, let’s learn how to string beads on cord using an awl to manipulate and tighten knots between beads is a standard knot technique. Always verify that the tip of your awl is straight and devoid of burrs to avoid it from snagging or fraying your knotting string.

DIRECTIONS

  1. Begin by reviewing the steps for knotting cords.
  2. After tying a loose overhand knot without twisting, slip it carefully off your hand and place it on the velvet board.
  3. Insert the awl into the middle of the loop created by the overhand knot while tying a knot with a single, double, or multiple cords. Utilize the awl to press the knot onto the initial bead firmly.
  4. Techniques for tying the knot differ according to the number of cords used.
    1. If you are tying a knot with a single cord, continue to slip the knot with the awl while pushing the working cord away from the knot. This motion will firmly bind the knot to the bead.
    1. If you tie a knot with double or more cords, tighten it by removing the awl and gripping one-half of the cords in each hand. Next, separate the cords from tightening the knot. This motion will firmly bind the knot to the bead.
  5. Slide the next bead down against the knot and repeat the knotting process until all the beads are secured. Do not tie a knot between the last bead and the second bead tip or bullion.
  6. Add the second bead tip or bullion and the other side of the clasp to complete the necklace.

Tweezer Knotting Techniques

Traditionally, knots are moved and tightened by tying knots between beads using tweezers. The tips of tweezers made particularly for knotting are long and slim. Read below to learn how to string beads on cord using tweezer knotting techniques.

  1. Please review the methods for dealing with cords once more before starting to tie knots with tweezers.
  2. After tying a loose overhand knot, you must continue to hold it around your hand.
  3. Insert the tweezers into the open loop of the overhand knot and beneath the cord wrapped around your hand. Use the tweezers to secure the bead by grasping the string slightly above it. Remove your hand from the loop as you draw the working string to set the knot against the first bead.
  4. Depending on the number of cords you are using, use one of the following procedures to tighten the knot:
    1. If you use a single string, slip the knot against the bead by positioning the tip of the tweezers within the knot’s loop. Next, take the tweezers out of the knot’s loop. Finally, position the tweezers outside the knot and slide them against the bead while drawing the working string away from the knot.
    1. If using double or more cords, remove the tweezers from the knot and use them to slide the knot against the bead. To tighten, hold each cord in one hand. Then, pull the cords apart gently to fasten the knot against the first bead.
  5. Slide the next bead against the knot and repeat the knotting process until all beads are in place and tied. Do not tie a knot between the last bead and the tip of the second bead.
  6. Add the second bead tip and the other side of the clasp to complete the necklace. Again, control the force on the tweezers so that the silk does not fray.

How to String Beads on Cord: Knotting without Equipment

Modern methods for moving and tightening knots involve tying knots between beads without equipment. Once learned, this form of knotting is simple, quick, and portable. However, it would help if you stretched the silk before commencing a knotting activity using a silk cord.

DIRECTIONS

  1. To begin, please study the procedures for basic cord knotting.
  2. Slide the first bead down adjacent to the tip and make a loose overhand knot, regardless of whether you use a single, double, or many cords. Do not tie a knot between the tip of the first bead and the first bead.
  3. After tying a loose overhand knot, you must continue to hold it around your hand.
  4. Follow the technique outlined below to tighten the knot against the first bead.
    1. If using a single cord, tighten the knot by pushing the knot with the following two beads while pulling the working string away from the knot. This motion will firmly bind the knot to the bead. Again, utilizing two beads provides the necessary leverage against the knot.
    1. If using double or multiple cords, tighten the knot by holding one-half of the cords in each hand and pushing them apart firmly. This motion will firmly bind the knot to the bead.
  5. Continue tying knots by sliding each successive bead down against the previous knot and continuing the proper knotting procedure until all beads are tied. Do not tie a knot between the last bead and the tip of the second bead.
  6. Add the second bead tip and the other side of the clasp to complete the necklace.

Completion Techniques

In addition to knotting between beads, knots are commonly employed to complete beaded jewelry that lacks a clasp or must be length adjustable.

Adjustable Double Knot Closure (Sliding Style)

DIRECTIONS

  1. Cut the cord longer than the desired finishing length: 4 to 6 inches for bracelets and 6 to 8 inches for necklaces.
  2. The beads are strung and positioned in the center of the string. Cross one end of the cord over the other, allowing a few inches of working space on both sides. Use your thumb and fingers to grasp the two cords that are crossed.
  3. To tie the first sliding knot, wrap one end of the string twice around the other.
  4. Pass the end of the cord from behind.
  5. Pull both ends of the string opposite directions to tighten the initial sliding knot.
  6. To create the second sliding knot, wrap the opposite end of the cord around the piece’s loop and put the knot opposite the previous sliding knot.
  7. Follow preceding steps 4 and 5 to tie the same knot. To position the two knots evenly, it may be necessary to retie this knot many times. Remove any extra cord.
  8. Slip the knots away from the beads to enlarge the width or gap. Then, slide the knots towards the beads to shorten or close the piece.

Macrame- Style Square Knot Closure

DIRECTIONS

  1. To create this style of closure, add 12 inches to the entire length of cord used in your creation. Leave a 6-inch length of cord at the beginning and another after the piece. After beading your necklace, arrange the end cords to create a circle and parallel one another. Underneath these cords, place a second 18-inch knotting cord horizontally.
  2. Using the Square Knot method, tie three or four square knots with a separate piece over these cords. Ensure that the knots are sufficiently slack to glide over the base cords.
  3. To complete the square knot closure, add a drop of superglue, allow it to dry, and trim the ends.
  4. To complete the ends of the jewelry, trim the tails to the appropriate length and add beads or tie overhand knots at the ends. Next, add a drop of superglue, then let it dry.

The Button-and-Loop Method

This is a traditional finishing method that does not use glue. Instead, silk wraps are typically used to create the loop end of a button-and-loop closure.

DIRECTIONS

  1. Cut the cord that will be used for beading 6 to 8 inches longer than the required length of the final piece.
  2. Cut a 16 to 18-inch-long wrapping cord from silk, nylon, or waxed linen.
  3. Create the loop by folding the stringing cord at one end.
  4. Fold the wrapping cord so that one tail measures three-quarters of the cord’s length and the other tail measures one-fourth of the cord’s length.
  5. Position your wrapping cord’s loop away from the beading cord’s loop. Constrict both cords with your fingers.
  6. Begin by tightly winding the long tail of the wrapping cord around the shorter and beading cord. Place this initial wrap at the bottom of the beading cord loop, ensuring the loop is the appropriate size for the button you will use.
  7. Wind slowly away from the beading cord’s loop and toward the wrapping cord’s loop. Place each wrap neatly next to its predecessor. Continue wrapping until the required length has been reached. Despite the technique’s name, waxed linen is the optimal material for constructing a secure silk wrap.
  8. Pass the long tail you’ve been working with through the loop of the wrapping cord to finish.
  9. Pull the short tail at the other end of the silk wrap to attach the long tail beneath the wrapped section’s center. Position and tighten this knot by tugging in opposing directions on the long and short ends of the wrapping cord.
  10. Cut the wrapping cord’s long and short tails. Cut the short end of the beading cord as close as feasible to the wrapped portion to conceal it in the silk wrap. Ensure that you do not cut the silk wrap itself. No adhesive is required!

Browse Related Articles

fantasy charms
Industry News

Shop Fantasy Charms at Xinar Today

Immerse yourself in the enchanting world of fantasy with Xinar’s exquisite collection of sterling silver fantasy charms. Whether you’re a

spiritual creatures
Industry News

What Are Spiritual Creatures?

The concept of spiritual creatures inhabits a fascinating space at the intersection of faith, mythology, and folklore. These beings, thought

Xinar's Shipping Policy

The domestic shipping charge is a flat rate of $3.95, no matter how many items you wish to purchase.

Priority mail is a flat rate of $8.25.

Canada shipping is a flat rate of $15.00.

International shipping is a flat rate of $17.00.

Items shipped via United States Postal Service with tracking.